Energy storage at the micro-/nanoscale

Large-area rolled-up nanomembrane capacitor arrays

Large-area rolled-up nanomembrane capacitor arrays 

Miniaturization of electronic devices and reduction of their footprint areas are essential ingredients towards efficient development of energy autonomous systems and electronic circuitry. We demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating ultracompact energy storage elements employing rolled-up nanotechnology. These elements highlight the flexibility and high yield of the parallel fabrication process, which results in a substantial reduction in the device dimensions and better integration of the devices into future miniaturized electronic systems. 

R. Sharma et al., Adv. Energy Mater. 4, 1301631 (2014) URL PDF

Multichannel anodes for lithium-ion batteries

Multichannel anodes for lithium-ion batteries

We employed rolled-up nanotechnology to fabricate sandwich-stacked SnO2/Cu hybrid nanosheets as multichannel anodes for lithium-ion batteries with the use of carbon black as inter-sheet spacer. The sandwich-stacked SnO2/Cu hybrid nanosheets exhibit significant improvement in cyclability compared to SnO2 nanosheets and SnO2/Cu hybrid nanosheets. By employing a direct self-rolling and compressing approach, a much higher effective volume efficiency is achieved as compared to rolled-up hollow tubes. This synthesis approach presents a promising route to design multichannel anodes for high performance Li-ion batteries.

J. Deng et al., ACS Nano 7, 6948 (2013) URL PDF

New battery research: rolled-up trilayer nanomembranes improve durability and lifetime

New battery research: rolled-up trilayer nanomembranes improve durability and lifetime

We report a new type of tubular configuration made from naturally rolled-up C/Si/C trilayer nanomembranes. A high capacity of ~2000 mAh g-1 can be retained at a current density of 50 mA g-1 without discernible decay, and the capacity can keep ~1000 mAh g-1 even after 300 cycles at 500 mA g-1 with almost 100% capacity retention. The trilayer structure design provides a stable conductive network and prevents Si pulverization and aggregation during cycling, thus guaranteeing superior electrochemical performance.

J. Deng et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Edit. 125, 2382–2386 (2013) URL PDF

Rolling their own for energy storage devices

Rolling their own for energy storage devices

We report a novel hybrid tubular structure composed of multilayer Ge and Ti nanomembranes with superior reversible capacity by rolled-up nanotech. The intrinsic strain accommodated in the Ge/Ti bilayer nanomembranes is efficiently released by a self-rolling process that thus offers a minimization of the whole system energy. The high conductivity, fast lithium ion diffusion and good volume tolerance of the material are evaluated by single tube devices. The proof of concept in this work paves the way for integration of microbatteries for chip-scale applications.

C. Yan et al., Adv. Mater. 25, 539 (2013) URL PDF

This work was highlighted in:

Renewable Energy (May, 2013) URL

Rolled-up nanotech for lithium energy storage devices

Rolled-up nanotech for lithium energy storage devices

Self-wound nanomembranes out of functional multilayers are designed to improve lithium storage performance. The intrinsic strain is relaxed by rolling; the composite components are uniformly dispersed; the micro/nanohierarchical structure assumes a mixed ion/electron conduction network; and conventional nanomembrane deposition techniques allow for various material combinations, suitable to meet different demands of lithium ion batteries. This work represents a further step towards extending the broad range of applications possible through rolled-up nanotech.

H.-X. Ji et al., Adv. Mater. 22, 4591 (2010) URL PDF

Self-wound ultra-compact energy storage elements

Self-wound ultra-compact energy storage elements

We have demonstrated the self-assembly of ultra-compact energy storage devices based on self-wound three-dimensional hybrid organic/inorganic nanomembranes. Such ultra-compact elements exhibit capacitances per footprint area higher than their state-of-the-art planar counterparts and reach specific energies comparable to supercapacitors. The combination of self-assembled organic monolayers with inorganic capacitor materials leads to elements with small footprints, remarkable performance and properties strongly correlated with the organic materials incorporated. Our results represent a breakthrough for local on-chip energy storage and energy supply for autonomous systems at the micro- and nanoscale.

C. C. Bof Bufon et al., Nano Lett. 10, 2506 (2010) URL PDF

This work was highlighted in:

  • New Scientist Magazine (June 26, 2010) URL
  • smartgrid (June 27, 2010) URL
  • Freie Presse (August 3, 2010)
  • Pro-Physik.de (August 4, 2010) URL
  • nanowerk (August 4, 2010) URL 
  • Scinexx (August 5, 2010) URL 
  • materialgates (August 6, 2010) URL
  • electroniknet.de (August 12, 2010) URL
  • GreenTech Germany (August 17, 2010) URL 
  • scienceknowledge.org (September 2, 2010) URL
First Swiss roll micro-supercapacitor

First Swiss roll micro-supercapacitor

Winding layers into batteries is an industry-standard to manufacture commercial batteries on the macroscale. On the micro- and nanoscale, however, applying external forces to roll-up layers is not possible any more. Here, we engineer strain in ultra-thin layers by deposition, which causes the layers to wind up automatically upon their release from a substrate. We demonstrate a redox Swiss roll micro-supercapacitor consisting of a self-rolled multilayered nanomembrane with an electrochemical active layer at either the outer or inner surface for different proton diffusion paths. The Swiss roll micro-supercapacitor is ideally suited to achieve high performance (e.g. capacity and life time) in a microscale power source and is helpful for studying charge transfer at the electrolyte/electrode interface.

H. X. Ji et al., Chem. Commun. 46, 3881 (2010) URL PDF

This work was highlighted by Chemical Communications as a “Hot article”.

Professor Oliver G. Schmidt

Director:

Prof. Dr. Oliver G. Schmidt
IFW Dresden
Helmholtzstr. 20
D-01069 Dresden

Contact: 

Office
Kristina Krummer
office-iin (at) ifw-dresden.de
Phone:+49 351 4659 810
Fax:+49 351 4659 782